Plasmapheresis for refractory status epilepticus part II: a scoping systematic review of the pediatric literature

Clinician Investigator Program, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada; Undergraduate Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3A 1R9, Canada; Section of Neurology, Montreal Neurological Institute, 3801 Rue University, McGill, Montreal, QC, H3A 2B4, Canada; Clinician Investigator Program, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada; Section of Critical Care Medicine, Dept of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada; Section of General Surgery, Dept of Surgery, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.

Seizure. 2016;43:61-68.
Abstract
BACKGROUND Our goal was to perform a scoping systematic review of the literature on the use of plasmapheresis or plasma exchange (PE) for refractory status epilepticus (RSE) in children. METHODS Articles from MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, Healthstar, Scopus, Cochrane Library, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, clinicaltrials.gov (inception to May 2016), reference lists of relevant articles, and gray literature were searched. The strength of evidence was adjudicated using both the Oxford and GRADE methodology by two independent reviewers. RESULTS Twenty-two original articles were identified, with 37 pediatric patients. The mean age of the patients was 8.3 years (age median: 8.5, range: 0.6 years-17 years). Seizure response to PE therapy occurred in 9 of the 37 patients (24.3%) included in the review, with 7 patients (18.9%) displaying resolution of seizures and 2 patients (5.4%) displaying a partial reduction in seizure volume. Twenty-eight of the 37 patients (75.7%) had no response to PE therapy. No adverse events were recorded. CONCLUSIONS Oxford level 4, GRADE D evidence exists to suggest little to no benefit of PE in pediatric RSE. Routine application of PE for pediatric RSE cannot be recommended at this time.
Study details
Study Design : Systematic Review
Language : English
Credits : Bibliographic data from MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine