Phase 3 randomised study of avatrombopag, a novel thrombopoietin receptor agonist for the treatment of chronic immune thrombocytopenia

Department of Haematology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland. Department of Haemostasis Disorders, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. Department of Internal Medicine, Haematology and Oncology, University Hospital Brno, Jihlavska, Czech Republic. Department of Haematology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland. Dova Pharmaceuticals, Durham, NC, USA. Dova Pharmaceuticals, Durham, NC, USA. Dova Pharmaceuticals, Durham, NC, USA.

British Journal of Haematology. 2018;183((3):):479-490.
Abstract
Avatrombopag, an oral thrombopoietin receptor agonist, was compared with placebo in a 6-month, multicentre, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group Phase 3 study, with an open-label extension phase, to assess the efficacy and safety of avatrombopag (20 mg/day) in adults with chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and a platelet count <30 x 10(9) /l (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01438840). The primary endpoint was the cumulative number of weeks of platelet response (platelet count &ge;50 x 10(9) /l) without rescue therapy for bleeding; secondary endpoints included platelet response rate at day 8 and reductions in the use of concomitant medications. Amongst the 49 patients randomised, avatrombopag (N = 32) was superior to placebo (N = 17) in the median cumulative number of weeks of platelet response (12.4 vs. 0.0 weeks, respectively; P < 0.0001). At day 8, a greater platelet response rate was also observed for patients treated with avatrombopag compared with placebo (65.63% vs. 0.0%; P < 0.0001), and use of concomitant ITP medications was also reduced amongst patients receiving avatrombopag. The safety profile of avatrombopag was consistent with Phase 2 studies; the most common adverse events were headache and contusion. Overall, avatrombopag was well tolerated and efficacious for the treatment of chronic ITP.
Study details
Language : English
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