Well-being and return rate of first-time whole blood donors

Institut fur Immunologie und Transfusionsmedizin, Universitatsmedizin Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. Institut fur Psychologie, Universitat Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. Institut fur Bioinformatik, Universitatsmedizin Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.

Vox sanguinis. 2019
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Previous studies observed a transient increase in well-being in about one-third of regular donors after blood donation. In addition, personal contact with donors after donation seems to increase return rates. We were interested whether changes in well-being and/or personal contact after the first donation impact return rates of first-time donors (FTDs). MATERIALS AND METHODS First-time donors were randomized to a questionnaire group (QG), in which questionnaires assessing the well-being had to be filled in, or a control group (CG), which was not contacted with a questionnaire. The QG had to complete the same questionnaire three times at the day of the first donation and then four times over an 8-week period with reminding calls by the study coordinator. Return rates of participants were followed for 12 months. RESULTS A total of 102 FTDs participated in the QG and 115 in the CG. Changes in well-being after the first donation had minimal impact on the return rates. In contrast, contacting FTDs after their first donation had a significant impact on the return rate of male donors (89.2% in the QG vs. 58.3% in the CG; P = 0.001). Females showed no significant difference in return rates between both groups (P = 0.32). CONCLUSION The well-being of FTDs had no influence on their return rate. The intervention of regular contacts during a research project follow-up resulted in an increased return rate of male but not of female FTDs. The pronounced difference of the impact of this intervention between male and female donors requires further studies.
Study details
Language : eng
Credits : Bibliographic data from MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine