The Effect of Diclofenac on Bleeding, Platelet Function, and Consumption of Opioids Following Cardiac Surgery

University Medical Centre Maribor Intensive Care and Pain Management Department of Anaesthesiology Maribor Slovenia Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care and Pain Management, University Medical Centre Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia.0000-0002-7723-5305 University Medical Centre Maribor Intensive Care and Pain Management Department of Anaesthesiology Maribor Slovenia Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care and Pain Management, University Medical Centre Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia. University of Maribor Faculty of Medicine Department of Anesthesia and Reanimation Maribor Slovenia Department of Anesthesia and Reanimation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia.

Braz J Cardiovasc Surg. 2020;35(2):160-168
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Abstract
OBJECTIVE To establish whether the use of diclofenac reduces the administration of opioids and how it affects bleeding and platelet function after the coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery with use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). METHODS A total of 72 patients undergoing CABG surgery were included in this retrospective randomized study and divided into two groups (34 patients received diclofenac and the control group of 38 patients did not). For postoperative analgesia, both groups were prescribed opioids (piritramide). The primary endpoint was to establish the consumption of opioids. The secondary endpoint was to determine bleeding and the function of platelets 20 hours after the surgery. RESULTS The consumption of piritramide (diclofenac group 26+/-8 mg vs. control group 28+/-8 mg), the blood loss, and the function of platelets did not significantly differ between the groups within 20 hours after surgery. C-reactive protein (CRP) was statistically significantly lower in the diclofenac group than in the control group (33+/-15 mg/L vs. 46+/-22 mg/L, respectively, P<0.05). CONCLUSION The study concluded that patients administered with diclofenac after the heart surgery did not consume less opioid analgesics and did not exhibit less symptoms linked to the consumption of opioids. Diclofenac in clinically administered doses does not interfere with the function of platelets and does not cause increased bleeding. Lower CRP in the diclofenac group may indicate a reduced inflammatory response after CPB. Therefore, diclofenac could be safe for use in patients undergoing CABG surgery but its value in reducing opioid consumption should be questioned.
Study details
Language : eng
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