Intraoperative tranexamic acid use in patients undergoing excision of intracranial meningioma: Randomized, placebo-controlled trial

Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Ben Arous, University of Tunis El Manar, Tunisia. Department of Neurosurgery, Traumatology and Severe Burns Center, Ben Arous, University of Tunis El Manar, Tunisia.

Surgical neurology international. 2021;12:289
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Abstract
BACKGROUND Intracranial meningioma resection is associated with substantial intraoperative bleeding. Intraoperative tranexamic acid (TXA) use can reduce bleeding in a variety of surgical procedures. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of TXA treatment on blood loss and transfusion requirements in patient undergoing resection of intracranial meningioma. METHODS We conducted a prospective, randomized double-blind clinical study. The patient scheduled to undergo excision of intracranial meningioma were randomly assigned to receive intraoperatively either intravenous TXA or placebo. Patients in the TXA group received intravenous bolus of 20 mg/kg over 20 min followed by an infusion of 1 mg/kg/h up to surgical wound closure. Efficacy was evaluated based on total blood loss and transfusion requirements. Postoperatively, thrombotic complications, convulsive seizure, and hematoma formation were noted. RESULTS Ninety-one patients were enrolled and randomized: 45 received TXA (TXA group) and 46 received placebo (group placebo). Total blood loss was significantly decreased in TXA group compared to placebo (283 ml vs. 576 ml; P < 0.001). Transfusion requirements were comparable in the two groups (P = 0.95). The incidence of thrombotic complications, convulsive seizure, and hematoma formation was similar in the two groups. CONCLUSION TXA significantly reduces intraoperative blood loss, but did not significantly reduced transfusion requirements in adults undergoing resection of intracranial meningioma.
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Language : eng
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