The Efficacy and Safety of Epsilon-Aminocaproic Acid for Perioperative Blood Management in Spinal Fusion Surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Department of Plastic and Burn Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, No. 37 Guoxue Lane, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan, China. Department of Orthopaedics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, No. 37 Guoxue Lane, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan, China. Department of Plastic and Burn Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, No. 37 Guoxue Lane, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan, China. Electronic address: zhangzy.wch@foxmail.com.

World neurosurgery. 2021
Abstract
BACKGROUND Perioperative blood loss is a major concern in spinal fusion surgery, which often requires blood transfusion. A large amount of perioperative blood loss might increase the risks of various perioperative complications. Recently, there has been a series of clinical studies focusing on the perioperative administration of epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA) in spinal fusion surgery. The aim of this review was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of EACA in spinal fusion surgery. METHODS We systematically searched electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) up to April 2021. The perioperative blood loss, blood transfusion and complication data were extracted and analysed by RevMan Manager 5.3. RESULTS Finally, six randomized controlled studies, involving 398 patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery, were enrolled in this systematic review. Compared with the blank control group, the EACA group had significantly lower total perioperative blood loss, postoperative blood loss, postoperative hemoglobin, postoperative blood transfusion units, total blood transfusion units, and postoperative red blood cell transfusion units. Additionally, no significant differences were observed between the EACA group and control group in intraoperative blood loss, intraoperative blood transfusion units, intraoperative crystalloid administered, hospital stays, operative time, perioperative respiratory complications, and wound bleeding. CONCLUSIONS EACA in patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery is effective in perioperative hemostasis without increasing the incidence of postoperative complications. However, the long-term adverse side of EACA in spinal fusion surgery still need more large-scale trials.
Study details
Study Design : Systematic Review
Language : eng
Credits : Bibliographic data from MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine