Evaluating the Impact of Cardiopulmonary Bypass Priming Fluids on Bleeding After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

PICU Evelina London Children's Hospital, St Thomas' Hospital, London, United Kingdom. Haematology, St Thomas' Hospital, London, United Kingdom; Department of Women and Children's Health, School of Life Course Sciences, King's College London, London, UK. PICU Evelina London Children's Hospital, St Thomas' Hospital, London, United Kingdom; Department of Women and Children's Health, School of Life Course Sciences, King's College London, London, UK.. Electronic address: shane.tibby@gstt.nhs.uk.

Journal of cardiothoracic and vascular anesthesia. 2021
Abstract
OBJECTIVES Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) predisposes young children to coagulopathy. The authors evaluated possible effects of CPB priming fluids on perioperative bleeding in pediatric cardiac surgery. DESIGN Meta-analysis and systematic review of previously published studies. SETTING Each study was conducted in a surgical center or intensive care unit. PARTICIPANTS Studies investigating patients <18 years without underlying hematologic disorders were included. INTERVENTIONS The authors evaluated randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published between 1980 and 2020 on MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and CENTRAL databases. The primary outcome was postoperative bleeding; secondary endpoints included blood product transfusion, mortality, and safety. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Twenty eligible RCTs were analyzed, with a total of 1,550 patients and a median of 66 patients per study (range 20-200). The most frequently assessed intervention was adding fresh frozen plasma (FFP) to the prime (8/20), followed by albumin (5/20), artificial colloids (5/20), and blood-based priming solutions (3/20). Ten studies with 771 patients evaluated blood loss at 24 hours in mL/kg and were included in a meta-analysis. Most of them investigated the addition of FFP to the priming fluid (7/10). No significant difference was found between intervention and control groups, with a mean difference of -0.13 (-2.61 to 2.34), p = 0.92, I(2) = 69%. Further study endpoints were described but their reporting was too heterogeneous to be quantitatively analyzed. CONCLUSIONS This systematic review of current evidence did not show an effect of different CPB priming solutions on 24-hour blood loss. The analysis was limited by heterogeneity within the dataset regarding population, type of intervention, dosing, and the chosen comparator, compromising any conclusions.
Study details
Study Design : Systematic Review
Language : eng
Credits : Bibliographic data from MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine