Clinical Efficacy of Early Administration of Human Immunoglobulin on Children with Severe Hand-foot-mouth Disease

Department of Pediatrics, Children's Centre, Beijing Luhe Hospital Affiliated to Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China.

Journal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons--Pakistan : JCPSP. 2023;33(2):234-236
PICO Summary

Population

Children with severe hand, foot and mouth disease (n= 140).

Intervention

Routine treatment + early intravenous injection of human immunoglobulin (n= 70).

Comparison

Routine treatment (n= 70).

Outcome

Serum c-reactive protein, creatine kinase, and creatine kinase isoenzyme in children who received routine treatment were lower than those who received the routine treatment + human immunoglobulin after treatment. The total clinical effective rate of routine treatment + human immunoglobulin was 92.9%, which was higher than that of routine treatment (80.0%).
Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical effect of early administration of human immunoglobulin in children with severe hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) and its influence on serum c-reactive protein (CRP), creatine kinase (CK), and creatine kinase isoenzyme (CK-MB). One hundred and forty children with severe HFMD were randomly divided into Group A (n=70) and Group B (n=70) according to the random number table method. Group A was treated with routine treatment. Group B was treated with routine treatment, and an early intravenous injection of human immunoglobulin. Serum CRP, CK, and CK-MB in Group B were lower than those in Group A after treatment (all p <0.001). The total clinical effective rate of Group B was 92.9%, which was higher than that of Group A (80.0%, p=0.026). Early administration of human immunoglobulin may reduce the levels of serum markers CRP, CK, and CK-MB in children with severe HFMD. Key Words: Human immunoglobulin, Children, HFMD (Hand, foot and mouth disease).
Study details
Language : eng
Credits : Bibliographic data from MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine