Erythropoietin to treat anaemia in critical care patients: a multicentre feasibility study

Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Angers University, CHU Angers, Angers, France. Réanimation polyvalente, CH de Cholet, Cholet, France. Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, CHRU Tours, Tours, France. Department of Biostatistics and Methodology, CHU Angers, Angers, France.

Anaesthesia. 2023
Abstract
Anaemia is common and associated with poor outcomes during and after critical illness. The use of erythropoietin to treat such anaemia is controversial with older studies showing mixed results. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the feasibility of performing a large multicentre randomised controlled trial of erythropoietin in this setting. We randomly allocated patients staying in the ICU for ≥ 72 h with haemoglobin ≤ 120 g.l(-1) to either a weekly injection of erythropoietin (40,000 iu, maximum of five injections) or placebo (saline). The primary endpoint was feasibility (as measured by recruitment, randomisation and follow-up rates, and protocol compliance). Secondary endpoints included biological efficacy and clinical outcomes. Forty-two participants were recruited and randomly allocated, all participants received the allocated intervention, but one withdrew their consent and refused the use of their data, leaving 20 in the erythropoietin group and 21 in placebo group. Follow-up was completed for all patients who survived. The overall recruitment rate was 73.7% with 8.4 participants recruited on average per month. The last haemoglobin measured before hospital discharge (or death) was similar between the groups with a mean (SD) haemoglobin of 107 (21) vs. 95 (25) g.l(-1) , mean difference (95%CI) 11 (-4-26), g.l(-1) , p = 0.154. A large, multicentre randomised controlled trial of erythropoietin to treat anaemia in ICU patients is feasible and necessary to determine effects of erythropoietin on mortality in ICU anaemic patients.
Study details
Language : eng
Credits : Bibliographic data from MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine