Effect of acetylsalicylic acid usage and platelet transfusion on postoperative hemorrhage and activities of daily living in patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage

J Neurosurg. 2013 Jan;118(1):94-103 doi: 10.3171/2012.9.JNS112286.
Abstract
OBJECT:

The authors evaluated the effects of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) usage and transfusion of previously frozen apheresis platelets on postoperative hemorrhage, activities of daily living (ADL) score, and mortality rate in patients with acute hypertensive basal ganglia hemorrhage undergoing craniotomy.

METHODS:

This was a prospective, double-blind, parallel, randomized controlled trial in patients with acute hypertensive basal ganglia hemorrhage, who had either not received ASA therapy (control) or received ASA therapy. The patients who received ASA therapy were divided according to the results of a platelet aggregation test into ASA-resistant, ASA-semiresponsive, and ASA-sensitive groups. All patients required an emergency craniotomy for hematoma removal after hospitalization. The patients who were sensitive to ASA were randomized to receive one of the following transfusion regimens of previously frozen apheresis platelets: no transfusion, 1 therapeutic dose before surgery, or 2 therapeutic doses (1 before surgery and 1 after 24 hours of hospitalization). The postoperative hemorrhage rate and the average postoperative hemorrhage volume were recorded and the ADL scores and mortality rate were measured during a 6-month follow-up period.

RESULTS:

The rate of postoperative hemorrhage, average postoperative hemorrhage volume, and mortality rate were significantly higher in the ASA-sensitive patients who received ASA therapy compared with patients who did not receive ASA therapy (all p < 0.005). The ADL scores were grouped into different grades and the number of cases in the lower grades was higher and the overall scores were poorer in patients who received ASA therapy compared with those who did not (all p < 0.005). After transfusion of previously frozen apheresis platelets, the postoperative hemorrhage rate, average postoperative hemorrhage volume, and mortality rate of the ASA-sensitive patients were significantly lowered (all p < 0.005), and the ADL scores and their classification level were better than those of patients who did not undergo transfusion (all p < 0.005).

CONCLUSIONS:

Transfusion of previously frozen apheresis platelets reduces the rate of postoperative hemorrhage, average postoperative hemorrhage volume, disability rate, and mortality rate in ASA-sensitive patients with acute hypertensive basal ganglia hemorrhage undergoing craniotomy.

Metadata
MESH HEADINGS: Activities of Daily Living; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Aspirin; Basal Ganglia; Craniotomy; Double-Blind Method; Female; Humans; Hypertension; Intracranial Hemorrhages; Male; Middle Aged; Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors; Platelet Transfusion; Postoperative Hemorrhage
Study Details
Study Design: Randomised Controlled Trial
Credits: Bibliographic data from MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine