2 results
Filters • 5
Sort By
Results Per Page
Filters
2 results
5
Download the following citations:
Email the following citations:
Print the following citations:
Editor's Choice
  • Skubas NJ
  • Callum J
  • Bathla A
  • Keshavarz H
  • Fergusson D
  • et al.
Br J Anaesth. 2024 Feb;132(2):237-250 doi: 10.1016/j.bja.2023.11.009.
POPULATION:

Paediatric and adult patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery (42 randomised controlled trials).

INTERVENTION:

Intravenous albumin.

COMPARISON:

Synthetic colloids and crystalloids.

OUTCOME:

Primary outcome of all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included renal failure, blood loss, duration of hospital or intensive care unit stay, cardiac index, and blood component use. Mortality was assessed in 15 trials (n= 2,711) and the risk difference was 0.00; 95% confidence interval (CI) [-0.01, 0.01] I(2)= 0%. Among secondary outcomes, intravenous albumin resulted in smaller fluid balance, mean difference -0.55 L; 95% CI [-1.06, -0.4], I(2)= 90% (nine studies, n= 1,975) and higher albumin concentrations, mean difference 7.77 gL(-1); 95% CI [3.73, 11.8], I(2)= 95% (six studies, n= 325). Intravenous albumin use was not associated with a difference in morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery, when compared with comparator fluids.

BACKGROUND:

Intravenous albumin is commonly utilised in cardiovascular surgery for priming of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit, volume replacement, or both, although the evidence to support this practice is uncertain. The aim was to compare i.v. albumin with synthetic colloids and crystalloids for paediatric and adult patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery for all-cause mortality and other perioperative outcomes.

METHODS:

A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of i.v. albumin compared with synthetic colloids and crystalloids on the primary outcome of all-cause mortality was conducted. Secondary outcomes included renal failure, blood loss, duration of hospital or intensive care unit stay, cardiac index, and blood component use; subgroups were analysed by age, comparator fluid, and intended use (priming, volume, or both). We searched MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CCRT) from 1946 to November 23, 2022.

RESULTS:

Of 42 RCTs, mortality was assessed in 15 trials (2711 cardiac surgery patients) and the risk difference was 0.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.01 to 0.01, I2=0%. Among secondary outcomes, i.v. albumin resulted in smaller fluid balance, mean difference -0.55 L, 95% CI -1.06 to -0.4, I2=90% (nine studies, 1975 patients) and higher albumin concentrations, mean difference 7.77 g L-1, 95% CI 3.73-11.8, I2=95% (six studies, 325 patients).

CONCLUSIONS:

Intravenous albumin use was not associated with a difference in morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery, when compared with comparator fluids. The lack of improvement in important outcomes with albumin and its higher cost suggests it should be used restrictively.

SYSTEMATIC REVIEW PROTOCOL:

PROSPERO; CRD42020171876.

Editor's Choice
  • Wang T
  • Wang J
  • Zhang M
  • Zhang H
  • Zhang Q
  • et al.
BMC Anesthesiol. 2024 Jan 16;24(1):26 doi: 10.1186/s12871-024-02414-y.
POPULATION:

Adult patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (10 randomised controlled trials).

INTERVENTION:

Network meta-analysis (NMA) to perform direct comparisons, including albumin vs. artificial colloid and artificial colloid vs. crystalloid, and to obtain indirect evidence for the comparisons between albumin and crystalloid priming strategies.

COMPARISON:

OUTCOME:

Direct meta-analysis indicated that crystalloid priming significantly decreased total perioperative red blood cell (RBC) transfusions (MD -0.68U; 95% CI [-1.26, -0.09U]) and intraoperative RBC transfusions (MD -0.20U; 95% CI [-0.39, -0.01U]) compared to albumin. Postoperative RBC transfusions showed a decreasing trend in the crystalloid group; however, the difference was not statistically significant (MD -0.16U; 95% CI: [-0.45, 0.14U]). After including indirect evidence, the NMA results continued to demonstrate a higher RBC receiving with the albumin priming strategy compared to crystalloids, although the differences did not reach statistical significance.

BACKGROUND:

In on-pump cardiac surgery, the albumin priming strategy could maintain colloid osmotic pressure better than crystalloid solutions and reduce excessive perioperative fluid balance. However, a high-quality meta-analysis is required to compare the safety of these approaches in perioperative red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. Owing to limited direct evidence, we conducted a network meta-analysis (NMA) to increase the pool of studies and provide indirect evidence.

METHODS:

The pre-defined primary outcomes were intraoperative and the first 24 h postoperative RBC transfusion volume in units. The pre-defined secondary outcome was postoperative blood loss (the first 24 h). We reviewed all randomized controlled trials comparing albumin, crystalloid, and artificial colloid priming strategies. Studies that only displayed pre-defined outcomes could be included. A pairwise meta-analysis was performed on studies that directly compared the pre-defined outcomes between albumin and crystalloids. Additionally, a random-effects network meta-analysis (NMA) model was employed to generate indirect evidence for the pre-defined outcomes between albumin and crystalloids.

RESULTS:

The literature search identified 830 studies,10 of which were included in the final analysis. Direct meta-analysis indicated that crystalloid priming significantly decreased total perioperative RBC transfusions (MD: -0.68U; 95%CI: -1.26, -0.09U; P = 0.02) and intraoperative RBC transfusions (MD: -0.20U; 95%CI: -0.39, -0.01U; P = 0.03) compared to albumin. Postoperative RBC transfusions showed a decreasing trend in the crystalloid group; however, the difference was not statistically significant. (MD: -0.16U; 95%CI: -0.45, 0.14U; P = 0.30). After including indirect evidence, the NMA results continued to demonstrate a higher RBC receiving with the albumin priming strategy compared to crystalloids, although the differences did not reach statistical significance. For postoperative blood loss, direct evidence showed no significant differences between albumin and crystalloid priming strategies. However, NMA evidence displayed that albumin exist higher probability of reducing postoperative blood loss than crystalloid.

CONCLUSION:

Both direct and NMA evidence indicated that the albumin priming strategy resulted in more perioperative RBC transfusions than crystalloids. Considering the additional blood management burden, the application of an albumin-priming strategy in on-pump cardiac surgery still needs more consideration.