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Editor's Choice
  • Liu CW
  • Anih J
  • Lebedeva V
  • Gungor A
  • Wang C
  • et al.
J Clin Anesth. 2024 Jun;94:111417 doi: 10.1016/j.jclinane.2024.111417.
POPULATION:

Patients undergoing non-obstetric surgery (300 trials, n= 53,085).

INTERVENTION:

Intravenous tranexamic acid.

COMPARISON:

Placebo or usual care without tranexamic acid.

OUTCOME:

From all the included studies, 45,958 participants (86.6%) were enrolled in 228 trials (76.0%) that explicitly excluded patients with kidney disease. Definitions of kidney diseased used for exclusion varied widely. Most were non-specific and some corresponded to mild disease. Only 5 trials adjusted dosing for kidney function. Meta-analysis of two large trials found tranexamic acid unlikely to substantially increase or decrease the occurrence of thrombotic events in patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73m(2) (RR 0.95; 95% CI [0.83, 1.07]) or ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73m(2) (RR 1.00; 95% CI [0.91, 1.11], but both trials excluded patients with severe kidney disease. No analysis could be performed regarding seizure risk. One large trial in non-cardiac surgery reported similar reduction in bleeding across subgroups of kidney function but excluded patients with creatinine clearance <30 mL/min.

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

To assess how kidney disease is handled in randomized trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of perioperative tranexamic acid, and to evaluate its effects across levels of kidney function.

DESIGN:

Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

SETTING:

We screened studies from a previous comprehensive systematic review, and updated its search of PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane CENTRAL to July 31, 2023.

PATIENTS:

Patients undergoing non-obstetric surgery.

INTERVENTIONS:

Intravenous tranexamic acid compared to placebo or usual care without tranexamic acid.

MEASUREMENT:

We summarized the handling of kidney disease in eligibility criteria, dose adjustments for kidney function, and effects of tranexamic acid on thrombotic events, seizures, and bleeding by subgroups of kidney function.

MAIN RESULTS:

We evaluated 300 trials with 53,085 participants; 45,958 participants (86.6%) were enrolled in 228 trials (76.0%) that explicitly excluded patients with kidney disease. Definitions of kidney diseased used for exclusion varied widely. Most were non-specific and some corresponded to mild disease. Only 5 trials adjusted dosing for kidney function. Meta-analysis of two large trials found tranexamic acid unlikely to substantially increase or decrease the occurrence of thrombotic events in patients with eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m2 (RR, 0.95; 95% CI: 0.83 to 1.07) or ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73m2 (RR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.91 to 1.11; P for subgroup difference = 0.47), but both trials excluded patients with severe kidney disease. No analysis could be performed regarding seizure risk. One large trial in noncardiac surgery reported similar reduction in bleeding across subgroups of kidney function but excluded patients with creatinine clearance <30 mL/min.

CONCLUSIONS:

The large evidence base supporting perioperative tranexamic acid suffers from broad and unjustified exclusion of patients with kidney disease. Typical perioperative dosing of tranexamic acid is likely safe and effective in patients with creatinine clearance >30 mL/min, but effects in more severe kidney disease are unknown.

Editor's Choice
  • Zhang Y
  • Li J
  • Li X
  • Geng Q
  • Xie Y
  • et al.
Syst Rev. 2024 Apr 4;13(1):101 doi: 10.1186/s13643-024-02515-2.
POPULATION:

Patients with severe aplastic anaemia (16 studies, n= 2,148).

INTERVENTION:

Immunosuppressive therapy (IST) combined with eltrombopag (EPAG).

COMPARISON:

Immunosuppressive therapy.

OUTCOME:

The IST combined with the EPAG group had higher overall response rate (ORR) than the IST group at 3 months (pooled OR 2.10; 95% CI [1.58, 2.79]) and 6 months (pooled OR 2.13; 95% CI [1.60, 2.83]), but the difference between the two groups became statistically insignificant at 12 months (pooled OR 1.13; 95% CI [0.75, 1.72]). The results of complete response rate (pooled OR at 3 months 2.73; 95% CI [1.83, 4.09], 6 months 2.76; 95% CI [2.08, 3.67] and 12 months 1.38; 95% CI [0.85, 2.23]) were similar to ORR. Compared with the IST group, the IST combined with the EPAG group had better overall survival rate (pooled OR 1.70; 95% CI [1.15, 2.51]), but there were no statistically significant differences in event-free survival rate (pooled OR 1.40; 95% CI [0.93, 2.13]), clonal evolution rate (pooled OR 0.68; 95% CI [0.46, 1.00]) and other adverse events between the two groups.

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

Immunosuppressive therapy (IST) is the first choice for severe aplastic anemia (SAA) patients with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) limitation, and the main factor limiting its efficacy is too few residual hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC). Eltrombopag (EPAG), as a small molecule thrombopoietin receptor agonist, can stimulate the proliferation of residual HSPC and restore the bone marrow hematopoietic function of patients. In recent years, many studies have observed the efficacy and safety of IST combined with EPAG in the treatment of SAA, but the results are still controversial. The aim of this study is to systematically evaluate the efficacy and safety of IST combined with or without EPGA in the treatment of SAA.

METHODS:

We conducted a systematic review of all relevant literature published up to January 19, 2024. Pooled odds ratio (OR) was calculated to compare the rates, along with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and p value to assess whether the results were statistically significant by Review Manager 5.4.1. The p values for the interactions between each subgroup were calculated by Stata 15.1. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale and the Cochrane bias risk assessment tools were respectively used to evaluate the quality of the literature with cohort studies and randomized controlled trials. The Review Manager 5.4.1 and Stata 15.1 were used to assess bias risk and perform the meta-analysis.

RESULTS:

A total of 16 studies involving 2148 patients were included. The IST combined with the EPAG group had higher overall response rate (ORR) than the IST group at 3 months (pooled OR = 2.10, 95% CI 1.58-2.79, p < 0.00001) and 6 months (pooled OR = 2.13, 95% CI 1.60-2.83, p < 0.00001), but the difference between the two groups became statistically insignificant at 12 months (pooled OR = 1.13, 95% CI 0.75-1.72, p = 0.55). The results of complete response rate (CRR) (pooled OR at 3 months = 2.73, 95% CI 1.83-4.09, p < 0.00001, 6 months = 2.76, 95% CI 2.08-3.67, p < 0.00001 and 12 months = 1.38, 95% CI 0.85-2.23, p = 0.19) were similar to ORR. Compared with the IST group, the IST combined with the EPAG group had better overall survival rate (OSR) (pooled OR = 1.70, 95% CI 1.15-2.51, p = 0.008), but there were no statistically significant differences in event-free survival rate (EFSR) (pooled OR = 1.40, 95% CI 0.93-2.13, p = 0.11), clonal evolution rate (pooled OR = 0.68, 95% CI 0.46-1.00, p = 0.05) and other adverse events between the two groups. The results of subgroup analysis showed that different ages were a source of heterogeneity, but different study types and different follow-up times were not. Moreover, all p-values for the interactions were greater than 0.05, suggesting that the treatment effect was not influenced by subgroup characteristics.

CONCLUSION:

EPAG added to IST enables patients to achieve earlier and faster hematologic responses with a higher rate of complete response. Although it had no effect on overall EFSR, it improved OSR and did not increase the incidence of clonal evolution and other adverse events.

Editor's Choice
  • Infanti L
  • Leitner G
  • Moe M
  • Pehlic V
  • Cattaneo M
  • et al.
Front Med (Lausanne). 2024 Mar 19;11:1362941 doi: 10.3389/fmed.2024.1362941.
POPULATION:

Healthy persons with elevated ferritin and HFE variants (n= 30).

INTERVENTION:

Phlebotomy (removal of 450 mL whole blood) (n= 16).

COMPARISON:

Erythrapheresis (removal of 360 mL red blood cells) (n= 14).

OUTCOME:

The primary endpoint was the number of procedures needed to the ferritin target. The secondary objectives were duration of treatment and compliance. Twenty-seven participants completed the study. Treatment arm and HFE variant influenced the primary endpoint significantly. To ferritin levels <100 ng/mL, a median number of 7.5 (IQR= 6.2, 9.8) phlebotomies and 4.0 (IQR= 3.0, 5.8) erythraphereses was needed during a median of 66.5 days (IQR= 49, 103) and 78.5 days (IQR= 46, 139), respectively. Low haemoglobin (Hb) was the principal reason for protocol violation; anaemia occurred in 13 participants (48%). Immediate complications were infrequent; fatigue was reported after 25% of phlebotomies and 45% of erythraphereses. Thirty-five procedures were postponed because of low Hb and 15 for non-medical reasons. The median interval was 7.0 (IQR= 7.7) and 14.0 (IQR= 14, 20) days between phlebotomies and erythraphereses, respectively.

BACKGROUND:

Elevated serum ferritin with/without HFE variants in asymptomatic persons leads frequently to referral for blood donation. Hemochromatosis (p.C282Y/p.C282Y) only requires treatment. We evaluated safety and feasibility of iron removal in healthy persons with elevated ferritin and HFE variants using blood donation procedures.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Thirty subjects with ferritin >200 ng/mL (women) or >300 ng/mL (men) with p.C282Y/p.C282Y, p.C282Y/p.H63D or p.H63D/p.H63D were randomized to weekly phlebotomy (removal of 450 mL whole blood) or erythrapheresis (removal of 360 mL red blood cells) every 14 days. The ferritin target was <100 ng/mL. A full blood count and ferritin were measured at each visit. Hemoglobin (Hb) ≥140 g/L was required at inclusion. If Hb dropped to <120 g/L (women) or <130 g/L (men), procedures were postponed (7 or 14 days). Primary endpoint was the number of procedures needed to the ferritin target; secondary objectives were duration of treatment and compliance. The treatment effect was tested with Poisson regression; number of procedures and treatment duration were compared between study arms with the Kruskal-Wallis test.

RESULTS:

Twenty-five of 30 participants were men (83%); mean age was 47 years (SD 10.5), mean BMI 26.6 kg/m2 (SD 3.6); 17 had p.C282Y/p.C282Y, nine p.C282Y/p.H63D, four p.H63D/p.H63D. Median baseline Hb was 150 g/L (IQR 144, 1,559), median ferritin 504 ng/mL (IQR 406,620). Twenty-seven subjects completed the study. Treatment arm (p < 0.001) and HFE variant (p = 0.007) influenced the primary endpoint significantly. To ferritin levels <100 ng/mL, a median number of 7.5 (IQR 6.2, 9.8) phlebotomies and 4.0 (IQR 3.0, 5.8) erythraphereses (p = 0.001) was needed during a median of 66.5 days (IQR 49,103) and 78.5 days (IQR 46139), respectively (p = 0.448). Low Hb was the principal reason for protocol violation; anemia occurred in 13 participants (48%). Immediate complications were infrequent; fatigue was reported after 25% of phlebotomies and 45% of erythraphereses. Thirty-five procedures were postponed because of low Hb and 15 for non-medical reasons. The median interval was 7.0 (IQR 7.7) and 14.0 (IQR 14, 20) days between phlebotomies and erythraphereses, respectively.

CONCLUSION:

Blood donation procedures remove iron effectively in HC, but frequent treatments cause Hb decrease and fatigue that can impair feasibility.

Editor's Choice
  • Park HS
  • Yin A
  • Barranta C
  • Lee JS
  • Caputo CA
  • et al.
JCI Insight. 2024 Mar 14;9(8) doi: 10.1172/jci.insight.178460.
POPULATION:

COVID-19 outpatients at 23 centers in the USA (n= 734).

INTERVENTION:

COVID-19 convalescent plasma (CCP) (n= 366).

COMPARISON:

Control plasma (n= 368).

OUTCOME:

This secondary analysis correlated donor and recipient antibody levels to hospitalization risk among unvaccinated, seronegative CCP recipients within a randomized clinical trial that compared CCP to control plasma. The majority of COVID-19 CCP arm hospitalizations (15/17, 88%) occurred in this unvaccinated, seronegative subgroup. A functional cutoff to delineate recipient high versus low post-transfusion antibody levels was established by two methods: 1) analyzing virus neutralization-equivalent anti-Spike-receptor-binding-domain immunoglobulin G (anti-S-RBD IgG) responses in donors or 2) receiver operated curve (ROC) analysis. The high antibody recipients transfused early (symptom onset within 5 days) had no hospitalizations. A CCP recipient analysis for antibody thresholds correlated to reduced hospitalizations found a statistical significant association between early transfusion and high antibodies versus all other CCP recipients (or control plasma) with antibody cutoffs established by both methods: donor-based virus neutralization cutoff in post-transfusion recipients (0/85; 0% versus 15/276; 5.6%) or ROC based cutoff (0/94; 0% versus 15/267; 5.4%).

BACKGROUNDCOVID-19 convalescent plasma (CCP) virus-specific antibody levels that translate into recipient posttransfusion antibody levels sufficient to prevent disease progression are not defined.METHODSThis secondary analysis correlated donor and recipient antibody levels to hospitalization risk among unvaccinated, seronegative CCP recipients within the outpatient, double-blind, randomized clinical trial that compared CCP to control plasma. The majority of COVID-19 CCP arm hospitalizations (15/17, 88%) occurred in this unvaccinated, seronegative subgroup. A functional cutoff to delineate recipient high versus low posttransfusion antibody levels was established by 2 methods: (i) analyzing virus neutralization-equivalent anti-Spike receptor-binding domain immunoglobulin G (anti-S-RBD IgG) responses in donors or (ii) receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis.RESULTSSARS-CoV-2 anti-S-RBD IgG antibody was volume diluted 21.3-fold into posttransfusion seronegative recipients from matched donor units. Virus-specific antibody delivered was approximately 1.2 mg. The high-antibody recipients transfused early (symptom onset within 5 days) had no hospitalizations. A CCP-recipient analysis for antibody thresholds correlated to reduced hospitalizations found a statistical significant association between early transfusion and high antibodies versus all other CCP recipients (or control plasma), with antibody cutoffs established by both methods-donor-based virus neutralization cutoffs in posttransfusion recipients (0/85 [0%] versus 15/276 [5.6%]; P = 0.03) or ROC-based cutoff (0/94 [0%] versus 15/267 [5.4%]; P = 0.01).CONCLUSIONIn unvaccinated, seronegative CCP recipients, early transfusion of plasma units in the upper 30% of study donors' antibody levels reduced outpatient hospitalizations. High antibody level plasma units, given early, should be reserved for therapeutic use.TRIAL REGISTRATIONClinicalTrials.gov NCT04373460.FUNDINGDepartment of Defense (W911QY2090012); Defense Health Agency; Bloomberg Philanthropies; the State of Maryland; NIH (3R01AI152078-01S1, U24TR001609-S3, 1K23HL151826NIH); the Mental Wellness Foundation; the Moriah Fund; Octapharma; the Healthnetwork Foundation; the Shear Family Foundation; the NorthShore Research Institute; and the Rice Foundation.

Editor's Choice
  • Poston JN
  • Brown SP
  • Ilich A
  • Ginsburg AS
  • Herren H
  • et al.
Res Pract Thromb Haemost. 2024 Mar 1;8(2):102358 doi: 10.1016/j.rpth.2024.102358.
POPULATION:

Adult patients with a haematologic malignancy or aplasia undergoing chemotherapy, immunotherapy, or haematopoietic stem cell transplant, enrolled in the A-TREAT trial (n= 326).

INTERVENTION:

Tranexamic acid (TXA) (n= 163).

COMPARISON:

Placebo (n= 163).

OUTCOME:

This study was a post hoc analysis of the A-TREAT clinical trial data. TXA did not change the overall rate of infections, but the rate of severe infections (Common Toxicology Criteria for Adverse Events grade 3+) was lower in patients who received TXA compared with the placebo group. Patients who experienced grade 3+ infections had higher rates of World Health Organization grade 2+ bleeding and red blood cell transfusion requirements than patients who did not experience a grade 3+ infection, irrespective of treatment group. TXA did not impact other inflammatory outcomes such as mucositis, rash, or graft vs. host disease.

BACKGROUND:

Tranexamic acid (TXA) is an antifibrinolytic agent that reduces bleeding in a multitude of clinical settings from postpartum hemorrhage to trauma. TXA may have clinical effects unrelated to bleeding; plasminogen, the target of TXA, alters immune responses, and TXA appears to decrease the risk of infection in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, as well as joint arthroplasty.

OBJECTIVES:

To address whether TXA alters rates of infection and inflammatory outcomes in patients with hematologic malignancies.

METHODS:

We performed a post hoc analysis of outcomes of patients randomized to receive either TXA or placebo in the double-blinded, multicenter American Trial to Evaluate Tranexamic Acid Therapy in Thrombocytopenia (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT02578901).

RESULTS:

TXA did not change the overall rate of infections, but the rate of severe infections (Common Toxicology Criteria for Adverse Events grade 3+) was lower in patients who received TXA compared with the placebo group. Patients who experienced grade 3+ infections had higher rates of World Health Organization grade 2+ bleeding and red blood cell transfusion requirements than patients who did not experience a grade 3+ infection, irrespective of treatment group. TXA did not impact other inflammatory outcomes such as mucositis, rash, or graft vs host disease.

CONCLUSION:

Patients with hematologic malignancies who received TXA had less severe infections than those who received placebo with no difference in overall rate of infection or other inflammatory outcomes. Further investigation is needed on the impact of TXA on infections in this population.

Editor's Choice
  • Donohue JK
  • Iyanna N
  • Lorence JM
  • Brown JB
  • Guyette FX
  • et al.
Trauma Surg Acute Care Open. 2024 Feb 17;9(1):e001346 doi: 10.1136/tsaco-2023-001346.
POPULATION:

Patients at risk for haemorrhage receiving tranexamic acid before hospitalization, enrolled in the Study of Tranexamic Acid During Air Medical and Ground Prehospital Transport (STAAMP) Trial (n= 903).

INTERVENTION:

Prehospital tranexamic acid (TXA) (n= 447).

COMPARISON:

Placebo (n= 456).

OUTCOME:

This study was a secondary analysis of the STAAMP trial, comparing patients that received thromboelastography (TEG) (YES-TEG, n= 837) and patients unable to be sampled (NO-TEG, n= 66) to analyze subgroups in which to investigate TEG differences. NO-TEG patients had lower prehospital systolic blood pressure (SBP) (100 (78, 140) vs. 125 (88, 147)), lower prehospital Glascow Coma Score (14 (3, 15) vs. 15 (12, 15)), greater rates of prehospital intubation (39.4% vs. 24.4%) and greater mortality at 30 days (36.4% vs. 6.8%). NO-TEG patients had a greater international normalized ratio relative to the YES-TEG subgroup (1.2 (1.1, 1.5) vs. 1.1 (1.0, 1.2)). Within a severe prehospital shock cohort (SBP< 70), TXA was associated with a significant decrease in clot lysis at 30 min on multivariate analysis (β= -27.6; 95% CI [-51.3, -3.9].

BACKGROUND:

Tranexamic acid (TXA) has been hypothesized to mitigate coagulopathy in patients after traumatic injury. Despite previous prehospital clinical trials demonstrating a TXA survival benefit, none have demonstrated correlated changes in thromboelastography (TEG) parameters. We sought to analyze if missing TEG data contributed to this paucity of findings.

METHODS:

We performed a secondary analysis of the Study of Tranexamic Acid During Air Medical and Ground Prehospital Transport Trial. We compared patients that received TEG (YES-TEG) and patients unable to be sampled (NO-TEG) to analyze subgroups in which to investigate TEG differences. TEG parameter differences across TXA intervention arms were assessed within subgroups disproportionately present in the NO-TEG relative to the YES-TEG cohort. Generalized linear models controlling for potential confounders were applied to findings with p<0.10 on univariate analysis.

RESULTS:

NO-TEG patients had lower prehospital systolic blood pressure (SBP) (100 (78, 140) vs 125 (88, 147), p<0.01), lower prehospital Glascow Coma Score (14 (3, 15) vs 15 (12, 15), p<0.01), greater rates of prehospital intubation (39.4% vs 24.4%, p<0.01) and greater mortality at 30 days (36.4% vs 6.8%, p<0.01). NO-TEG patients had a greater international normalized ratio relative to the YES-TEG subgroup (1.2 (1.1, 1.5) vs 1.1 (1.0, 1.2), p=0.04). Within a severe prehospital shock cohort (SBP<70), TXA was associated with a significant decrease in clot lysis at 30 min on multivariate analysis (β=-27.6, 95% CI (-51.3 to -3.9), p=0.02).

CONCLUSIONS:

Missing data, due to the logistical challenges of sampling certain severely injured patients, may be associated with a lack of TEG parameter changes on TXA administration in the primary analysis. Previous demonstration of TXA's survival benefit in patients with severe prehospital shock in tandem with the current findings supports the notion that TXA acts at least partially by improving clot integrity.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

Level II.

Editor's Choice
  • Vogel JP
  • Nguyen PY
  • Ramson J
  • De Silva MS
  • Pham MD
  • et al.
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2024 Feb 7; doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2024.01.012.
POPULATION:

Women experiencing vaginal birth or caesarean delivery (22 studies).

INTERVENTION:

Care bundles for postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) prevention and/or treatment.

COMPARISON:

OUTCOME:

For prevention-only bundles (2 studies), low-certainty evidence suggests possible benefits in reducing blood loss, duration of hospitalization and intensive care unit stay, and maternal wellbeing. For treatment-only bundles (9 studies), high-certainty evidence shows that the E-MOTIVE intervention reduced risks of composite severe morbidity (RR 0.40; 95% CI [0.32, 0.50] as well as blood transfusion for bleeding, PPH, severe PPH, and mean blood loss. One non-randomized trial and seven uncontrolled studies suggest other PPH treatment bundles might reduce blood loss and severe PPH, but this is uncertain. For combined prevention/treatment bundles (11 studies), low-certainty evidence shows that the California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative (CMQCC) care bundle may reduce severe maternal morbidity (RR 0.64; 95% CI [0.57, 0.72]. Ten uncontrolled studies variably showed possible benefits, no effects, or harms for other bundle types.

OBJECTIVE:

Care bundles are a promising approach to reducing postpartum hemorrhage-related morbidity and mortality. We assessed the effectiveness and safety of care bundles for postpartum hemorrhage prevention and/or treatment.

DATA SOURCES:

We searched MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, Maternity and Infant Care Database, and Global Index Medicus (inception to June 9, 2023) and ClinicalTrials.gov and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (last 5 years) using a phased search strategy, combining terms for postpartum hemorrhage and care bundles.

STUDY ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA:

Peer-reviewed studies evaluating postpartum hemorrhage-related care bundles were included. Care bundles were defined as interventions comprising ≥3 components implemented collectively, concurrently, or in rapid succession. Randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials, interrupted time series, and before-after studies (controlled or uncontrolled) were eligible.

METHODS:

Risk of bias was assessed using RoB 2 (randomized trials) and ROBINS-I (nonrandomized studies). For controlled studies, we reported risk ratios for dichotomous outcomes and mean differences for continuous outcomes, with certainty of evidence determined using GRADE. For uncontrolled studies, we used effect direction tables and summarized results narratively.

RESULTS:

Twenty-two studies were included for analysis. For prevention-only bundles (2 studies), low-certainty evidence suggests possible benefits in reducing blood loss, duration of hospitalization, and intensive care unit stay, and maternal well-being. For treatment-only bundles (9 studies), high-certainty evidence shows that the E-MOTIVE intervention reduced risks of composite severe morbidity (risk ratio, 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.50) and blood transfusion for bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, severe postpartum hemorrhage, and mean blood loss. One nonrandomized trial and 7 uncontrolled studies suggest that other postpartum hemorrhage treatment bundles might reduce blood loss and severe postpartum hemorrhage, but this is uncertain. For combined prevention/treatment bundles (11 studies), low-certainty evidence shows that the California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative care bundle may reduce severe maternal morbidity (risk ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.57-0.72). Ten uncontrolled studies variably showed possible benefits, no effects, or harms for other bundle types. Nearly all uncontrolled studies did not use suitable statistical methods for single-group pretest-posttest comparisons and should thus be interpreted with caution.

CONCLUSION:

The E-MOTIVE intervention improves postpartum hemorrhage-related outcomes among women delivering vaginally, and the California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative bundle may reduce severe maternal morbidity. Other bundle designs warrant further effectiveness research before implementation is contemplated.

Editor's Choice
  • Kim D
  • Bashrum BS
  • Kotlier JL
  • Mayfield CK
  • Thompson AA
  • et al.
Arthrosc Sports Med Rehabil. 2024 Jan 16;6(1):100851 doi: 10.1016/j.asmr.2023.100851.
POPULATION:

Patients with hip osteoarthritis (15 systematic reviews).

INTERVENTION:

Systematic review to describe the incidence and types of spin bias in systematic reviews of platelet-rich plasma injections for hip osteoarthritis and to determine whether patterns in study characteristics could be identified among studies with identifiable spin.

COMPARISON:

OUTCOME:

All studies contained at least two types of spin (range 2-9), with a median of 2. The most common type of spin was type 14 ("Failure to report a wide confidence interval of estimates"), which was observed in 10 studies. The second most common type of spin was type 13 ("Failure to specify the direction of the effect when it favors the control intervention"), found in 6 studies. Several associations were found between spin types and the study characteristics of AMSTAR 2 rating, Scopus CiteScore, journal impact factor, and PROSPERO preregistration.

PURPOSE:

To describe the incidence and types of spin in systematic reviews of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections for hip osteoarthritis (OA) and to determine whether patterns in study characteristics could be identified among studies with identifiable spin.

METHODS:

The PubMed, Scopus, and SPORTDiscus databases were queried. Inclusion criteria were systematic reviews or meta-analyses that included an assessment of intra-articular PRP injections as a stand-alone treatment for hip OA. Two authors independently assessed the presence of spin in the included studies and recorded general study characteristics. The prevalence of the 15 different categories of spin was quantified using descriptive statistics.

RESULTS:

Fifteen studies met inclusion criteria for this study. All studies contained at least two types of spin (range 2-9), with a median of 2. The most common type of spin was type 14 ("Failure to report a wide confidence interval of estimates"), which was observed in 10 studies. The second most common type of spin was type 13 ("Failure to specify the direction of the effect when it favors the control intervention"), found in 6 studies.

CONCLUSIONS:

Spin is highly prevalent in abstracts of systematic reviews of PRP in the treatment of hip OA. Several associations were found between spin types and the study characteristics of AMSTAR 2 rating, Scopus CiteScore, journal impact factor, and PROSPERO preregistration. When present, spin in the abstracts of reviewed studies tended to favor the use of PRP in hip osteoarthritis.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

It is important to understand the prevalence of spin in published abstracts, especially in areas of great impact or interest, so authors and readers can have a greater awareness of this potential form of bias.

Editor's Choice
  • Al-Otaibi T
  • Nagib AM
  • Halim MA
  • Abo-Atya H
  • Mahmoud T
  • et al.
Exp Clin Transplant. 2024 Jan;22(Suppl 1):323-331 doi: 10.6002/ect.MESOT2023.P112.
POPULATION:

Adult kidney transplant recipients with stable graft function (n= 247).

INTERVENTION:

Targeted haemoglobin of 11 to 12 g/dL with the use of erythropoietin-stimulating agents (ESA) (group 1, n= 183)

COMPARISON:

Targeted haemoglobin of 13 to 15 g/dL with ESA (group 2, n= 64)

OUTCOME:

Patients underwent monthly clinical and laboratory evaluations of kidney graft function. Quality of life and echocardiography were assessed at study start and at 12 months. In group 2, there were comparable post-transplant complications, but better graft function at 6 months and better cardiac indexes at 1 year of the study. At 12 months, quality of life had improved after full correction of post-transplant anaemia in the renal transplant recipients who received erythropoietin-stimulating agents.

OBJECTIVES:

Posttransplant anemia might be associated with cardiovascular morbidity and increased mortality. To our knowledge, the debate on anemia correction has neither been revisited nor decided definitively. We aimed to assess the effects of full correction of posttransplant anemia on the cardiovascular system and quality of life among renal transplant recipients with stable graft function who were using erythropoietin-stimulating agents.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We enrolled 247 kidney recipients with stable graft function to be assessed for anemia. Eligible patients were randomized to achieve targeted hemoglobin of 11 to 12 g/dL (group 1, n = 183) or of 13 to 15 g/dL (group 2, n = 64) with the use of erythropoietin-stimulating agents. Patients underwent monthly clinical and laboratory evaluations of kidney graft function. Quality of life and echocardiography were assessed at study start and at 12 months.

RESULTS:

The 2 groups were comparable regarding pretransplant characteristics. In group 2, we observed comparable posttransplant complications (P > .05) but better graft function at 6 months and better cardiac indexes at 1 year of the study (P < .05). At 12 months, quality of life had improved after full correction of posttransplant anemia in the renal transplant recipients who received erythropoietinstimulating agents.

CONCLUSIONS:

Full correction of posttransplant anemia in renal transplant recipients was associated with improved quality of life and cardiac indexes without an effect on cardiovascular comorbidity.