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  • Fang M
  • Zhou J
  • Huang S
  • Zhang Y
  • He Y
  • et al.
BMJ Open. 2022 Dec 7;12(12):e056689 doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2021-056689.
INTRODUCTION:

Recent studies in animal models indicate that recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) is very effective in enhancing neurological recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI). We described a protocol aimed at evaluating the efficacy of rHuEPO plus methylprednisolone (MP) compared with MP alone in improving neurological function of patients with SCI in randomised controlled trials (RCTs).

METHODS AND ANALYSIS:

This study aims to explore the effect of rHuEPO combined with MP on neurological function in patients with SCI through a meta-analysis. To this end, the authors will search eight research databases for data retrieval: MEDLINE, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wan Fang, China Biology Medicine dis, Web of Science, PubMed, Cochrane and Embase for RCTs on SCI in any language. The primary outcome will be the American Spinal Injury Association score at the time of follow-up. The secondary outcomes will be the WHOQOL-100 instrument score, neurophysiological state and related factors. Two authors will independently search literature records, scan titles, abstracts and full texts, collect data, and assess materials for risk of bias. Stata V.14.0 will be used for statistical analysis.

ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION:

This research is exempt from ethics approval because the work is carried out on published documents. We will disseminate this protocol in scientific conferences and a peer-reviewed journal.

PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER:

CRD42021260688.

  • Wang H
  • Shen B
  • Zeng Y
Orthopedics. 2015 Nov;38(11):e1007-16 doi: 10.3928/01477447-20151020-10.

There has been much debate and controversy about the safety and efficacy of the topical use of tranexamic acid in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to perform a meta-analysis to evaluate whether there is less blood loss and lower rates of transfusion after topical tranexamic acid administration in primary TKA. A systematic review of the electronic databases PubMed, CENTRAL, Web of Science, and Embase was undertaken. All randomized, controlled trials and prospective cohort studies evaluating the effectiveness of topical tranexamic acid during primary TKA were included. The focus of the analysis was on the outcomes of blood loss results, transfusion rate, and thromboembolic complications. Subgroup analysis was performed when possible. Of 387 studies identified, 16 comprising 1421 patients (1481 knees) were eligible for data extraction and meta-analysis. This study indicated that when compared with the control group, topical application of tranexamic acid significantly reduced total drain output (mean difference, -227.20; 95% confidence interval, -347.11 to -107.30; P<.00001), total blood loss (mean difference, -311.28; 95% confidence interval, -404.94 to -217.62; P<.00001), maximum postoperative hemoglobin decrease (mean difference, -0.73; 95% confidence interval, -0.96 to -0.50; P<.00001), and blood transfusion requirements (risk ratios, 0.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.24 to 0.43; P=.14). The authors found a statistically significant reduction in blood loss and transfusion rates when using topical tranexamic acid in primary TKA. Furthermore, the currently available evidence does not support an increased risk of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism due to tranexamic acid administration. Topical tranexamic acid was effective for reducing postoperative blood loss and transfusion requirements without increasing the prevalence of thromboembolic complications.

  • Zeng Y
  • Zhou R
  • Duan X
  • Long D
  • Yang S
  • et al.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014 Aug 28;2014(8):CD010761 doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD010761.pub2.
BACKGROUND:

Acquired hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies to coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). In most cases, bleeding episodes are spontaneous and severe at presentation. The optimal hemostatic therapy is controversial.

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the efficacy of hemostatic therapies for acute bleeds in people with acquired hemophilia A; and to compare different forms of therapy for these bleeds.

SEARCH METHODS:

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 4) and MEDLINE (Ovid) (1948 to 30 April 2014). We searched the conference proceedings of the: American Society of Hematology; European Hematology Association; International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH); and the European Association for Haemophilia and Allied Disorders (EAHAD) (from 2000 to 30 April 2014). In addition to this we searched clinical trials registers.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

All randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials of hemostatic therapies for people with acquired hemophilia A, with no restrictions on gender, age or ethnicity.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

No trials matching the selection criteria were eligible for inclusion.

MAIN RESULTS:

No trials matching the selection criteria were eligible for inclusion.

AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS:

No randomised clinical trials of hemostatic therapies for acquired hemophilia A were found. Thus, we are not able to draw any conclusions or make any recommendations on the optimal hemostatic therapies for acquired hemophilia A based on the highest quality of evidence. GIven that carrying out randomized controlled trials in this field is a complex task, the authors suggest that, while planning randomised controlled trials in which patients can be enrolled, clinicians treating the disease continue to base their choices on alternative, lower quality sources of evidence, which hopefully, in the future, will also be appraised and incorporated in a Cochrane Review.

  • Zeng Y
  • Duan X
  • Xu J
  • Ni X
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011 Jul 6;2011(7):CD008235 doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD008235.pub2.
BACKGROUND:

Chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an acquired autoimmune disorder that is characterized predominantly by a low platelet count. Thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor agonists increase production of platelets by stimulating the TPO receptor in people with chronic ITP.

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the efficacy and safety of TPO receptor agonists in chronic ITP patients.

SEARCH STRATEGY:

We searched MEDLINE (from 1950 to March 2011), EMBASE (from 1974 to March 2011), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 3) to identify all randomized trials in chronic ITP. We also contacted authors of included studies and TPO receptor agonists manufacturers.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing TPO receptor agonists alone, or in combination with other drugs, to placebo, no treatment, other drugs, splenectomy or another TPO receptor agonist in patients with chronic ITP.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

Two review authors independently screened papers, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the included studies.

MAIN RESULTS:

Six trials with 808 patients were included. Five studies compared TPO receptor agonists with placebo (romiplostim: 100, eltrombopag: 299, placebo: 175); one study compared TPO receptor agonists with standard of care (SOC) (romiplostim: 157; SOC: 77). SOC included a variety of therapies, such as glucocorticoid, anti-D immune globulin, intravenous immune globulin, rituximab, azathioprine, and so on. Overall survival, one of our primary outcomes, was not studied by these RCTs and we could not estimate number needed to treat (NNT). Another primary outcome, improving significant bleeding events, did not reveal any significant differences between the TPO receptor agonists group and the control group (placebo or SOC) (versus placebo risk ratio (RR) 0.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20 to 1.15; versus SOC RR 0.49, 95% CI 0.15 to 1.63).For secondary outcomes, TPO receptor agonists statistically significantly improved overall platelet response (versus placebo RR 4.06, 95% CI 2.93 to 5.63; versus SOC RR 1.81, 95% CI 1.37 to 2.37), complete response (versus placebo RR 9.29, 95% CI 2.32 to 37.15) and durable response (versus placebo RR 14.16, 95% CI 2.91 to 69.01). There was a significant reduction in overall bleeding events (WHO grades 1 to 4) when compared to placebo (RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.89), but not when compared to SOC(RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.75 to 1.26).Total adverse events (Grades 1 to 5) were not statistically significantly different between the treatment and control groups(both placebo and SOC) (versus placebo RR 1.04, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.15; versus SOC RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.75 to 1.26). Total serious adverse events (Grade 3 and higher adverse events) were increased when patients receiving treatment with SOC (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.92), but not receiving treatment with placebo (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.61 to 1.38).There are selective and performance biases because of open-label and inadequate allocation.

AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS:

There was currently no evidence to support that TPO receptor agonists are effective in chronic ITP. Compared to placebo or SOC, despite significantly increased platelet response, there was no evidence to demonstrate that TPO receptor agonists did improve significant bleeding events in chronic ITP. The effect on overall survival awaits further analysis. Although long-term studies are lacking, current data demonstrated adverse effects of TPO receptor agonists were similar to that of placebo and SOC.